The Book Titles Tag

I couldn’t resist when I saw this one. I can’t name a single source for this one but you know who you are if you’ve done this one. I appreciate anyone who enjoys me doing these and, to anyone who doesn’t like these tags, I’ll be posting more reviews soon.

1 A book title that’s the story of your life

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I’m a huge fan of Felicia Day and I loved her autobiography. She’s very relatable and even the title spoke to me.

2. A title that describes your perfect weekend.

paper towns

One of the central themes in this book is traveling aimlessly from paper town to paper town. I love just driving around and sight-seeing all of these tiny towns.

3. Title of an adventure you’d like to go on

midnight in the garden

I have always wanted to go to Savannah, Georgia where this book is set. I’m fascinated with the paranormal so I would love to go on a ghost tour in Savannah.

4. Title you would want to name your child

go ask alicethe fault in our starsHarry_Potter_and_the_Sorcerer's_Stone

The first one is pretty obvious. I really like the name Hazel, the main character in The Fault in Our Stars. As for Harry Potter, there are an abundance of names in there that I would consider naming my kids.

5. Title of your ideal job

library of souls

I know it’s not a job title but I would like to work in a library, or just around books in general

6. Title of a place you would like to visit

the shining

I want to do a tour of haunted hotels, including the one that inspired The Shining. 

7. Title of your love life

Pride-and-Prejudice_BN

I’m just an Elizabeth Bennett looking for my Mr. Darcy

8. Questions you ask yourself

what if

My anxious and weird brain if full of “what ifs?”

9. Title of a kingdom you want to rule

Allegiant

I’ve mentioned before that I didn’t like this book but the title does make for a good kingdom name.

10. A title you would name your band

final girls

This one would be a good name for an all female-rock band. Also, I’ll be reviewing this book soon.

11. What is your current mood?

The_Hunger_Games

I’m kind of hungry right now.

12. What is your favorite color?

thecolorpurple6

13. How do you feel about this year so far?

the subtle art of not giving a fuck

Maybe some of you feel this way too.

14. Where do you want to travel?

dubliners

I want to go back to Dublin so badly.

15. What are you summer plans?

The_Book_Thief_by_Markus_Zusak_book_cover

I’m not planning on stealing books but I’m planning on stealing away into books.

16. What are your plans this year?

my salinger year

I’m really hoping to get an internship or, at least, apply for some internships.

For you, A thousand times over: Reviewing The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

I’ve mentioned this book before in tags and gushed about it. Thanks to a book sale at one of my local libraries, I was able to acquire a copy of the novel. I wish I had just bought when I had to read it for a class but now I have it. Now, I will tell you in detail about The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini.

Amir and Hassan were just two boys running wild in Kabul, Afghanistan. Despite the fact that Amir comes from an upper class and Hassan is servant, the two form a deep bond that seems to withstand everything. Everything changes, however, when the Soviets occupy Afghanistan and Amir flees the country with his father, never to see Hassan again. While living in America as an adult, Amir receives news that a family friend is ill. Now, he must return and face his past and come to terms with what fates that he and Hassan have been dealt.

Hosseini’s poignant novel follows the span of Amir’s life as he reflects on his whirlwind of a life in Kabul, Afghanistan. With moving themes about family, loyalty, childhood, religion and acceptance, The Kite Runner is a moving story that deals with these in a graceful manner. The subject matter does get intense and violent at times but it does not deter from the overall touching message of the novel. The first person narrative feels as though Amir is sitting their, telling you the story directly as he sorts out his past. The Kite Runner is a profound novel that takes the reader on an emotional journey from a childhood in Afghanistan to an adulthood of acceptance.

It’s an effed up world but it’s a two-player game!: Reviewing Be More Chill by Ned Vizzini

I’ve mentioned before that I haven’t read a lot of YA literature in recent years. I guess it’s because I’m in college now so I’m more than happy to forget about high school nonsense, even in fictional worlds. However, after listening to the musical of the same name that was based off of this novel, I knew I immediately had to tell everybody about this particular novel. I stole it from my sister for now so I can bring you a review of Be More Chill. 

Jeremy Heere is just another high school student struggling to get through the drama of it all with his best friend, Michael Mell, by his side. One day, Jeremy decides to change his life in order to ask out the beautiful Christine Caniglia on a date. That’s when he is introduced to the squip, a pill-sized supercomputer that can make him into the coolest guy in high school. Soon, Jeremy comes to face the disastrous consequences of giving complete control of his life to the malicious squip.

Vizinni perfectly mixes the realities of high school with a touch of science fiction absurdity. Be More Chill has a great balance of quirky humor and touching moments that emulates the struggles anyone who has been to high school can understand. It’s a fast-paced read with plenty of quirky characters who get you invested immediately. If you’re already a fan of the musical, you will love this novel. If you already love this novel, I highly recommend the musical of the same name. Be More Chill is the perfect read for YA lit lovers and/or high school students looking for a relatable novel.

The Harry Potter Spells Tag/Challenge

I’m back at it again with another book tag but I realized I hadn’t done a Harry Potter related one yet. I found this one on @becomingbookish  so check it out if you want. Other than that, enjoy this tag and feel free to participate in these tags too.

Expecto Patronum – A book associated with good childhood memories

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Well, obviously I have strong ties towards the Harry Potter series but I also loved A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’engle and The Dragon Rider by Cornelia Funk

Expelliarmus – A book that book you by surprise

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I had to read The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini for my World Lit class last semester and I ended up loving it. I definitely recommend it for anyone looking for a powerful story.

Prior Incantato – the last book you read

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The last book I read was The Shining by Stephen King. I haven’t finished it yet but I’m working on it.

Alohamora – A book that introduced you to a genre you hadn’t considered

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I used to be an avid Mortal Instruments fan and, though I don’t read it anymore, it introduced me to urban fantasy.

Riddikulus – the funniest book you read

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The Martian by Andy Weir is pretty hilarious. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Prachett is also a really funny read.

Sonorus – A book that everybody should know about

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I absolutely recommend American Gods by Neil Gaiman and The Secret History by Donna Tartt to just about everybody.

Obliviate – A book spoiler you would like to forget having read

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I skipped to the end of Allegiant, the final book in the Divergent series, because I was frustrated with the book then I was pissed at the ending and just gave up reading it.

Imperio – A book you had to read for school

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I’ve read a bunch of books for school so I’m going to say my favorites have been Dracula, The Great Gatsby, Brick Lane, and Fahrenheit 451. 

Crucio – A book that was painful to read

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The Book Thief hurt like hell but was still a great book. Also, The Mark of Athena hurt my feels.

Avada Kedavera – A book that you would kill

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Allegiant, Ender’s Game, The Lovely Bones, and The Gold Coast can suck it for all I care.

 

That’s the end of this book tag. I hope you enjoy this one too.

The hurting, the loving, the breaking, the healing: Reviewing Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

I was never a huge fan of poetry. I’ve read plenty of it and I do have favorites but I detested having to write it. If you were to ask me to write five pages describing my hometown, I could do that in a heartbeat. On the other hand, if you want me to write a poem about my hometown then you might as well be asking me to get blood from a stone. Nonetheless, I deeply admire poets and their ability to cram so many emotions into a few simple sentences. I will now happily introduce you to Rupi Kaur, a modern poet who captures complex emotions with her art and words.

Rupi Kaur’s debut collection of poetry, milk and honey, came to be in the most modern way: through the internet. Originally. Kaur began to post her poems and illustrations on Instagram and Tumblr for others to read. The book is split up into four different parts and covers topics that are typically taboo, particularly she delves into what femininity means in today’s world. Her simple but bold style is eye-catching. Kaur pours her heart and soul into this collection of poetry meant to empower and discuss the things that bother us.

Top 10 Short Stories I Must Recommend You Read

I know the title sounds like click bait but it got you to read my post, didn’t it? I’ve read more than my fair share of short stories over the years. I’m currently trying to write my own with little luck. There are a few that I absolutely love that you might enjoy too. The art of the short story is one that takes a while to master. It’s hard to convey a powerful message in just a few pages. These ones I have picked have a made an impact for me and I hope that they make an impact for you too.

  1. “The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe – I’ve a been a huge fan of Poe for years now and own several different editions of his complete collections. Though I absolutely love his other famous short stories, I love this one in particular for the sensory picture that Poe writes that creates a sense of impending doom and suspense as you read it.
  2. “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman – In only 6,000 words, Perkins Gilman provides a scathing indictment of the American mental health system. As told through the diary entries of a woman suffering from postpartum depression, “The Yellow Wallpaper” shows how improper treatment of mental illness in women can have devastating effects on the mind.
  3. “A Temporary Matter” by Jhumpa Lahiri from The Interpreter of Maladies – Lahiri’s bold and intimate writing provides an inside look at the struggles of people’s lives that others might overlook. In this particular story, a young couple must come to terms with the loss of their child and deterioration of their marriage during the nightly blackouts that occur in India. This story is has a heavy and poignant message that is palpable as you read it.
  4. “October in the Chair” by Neil Gaiman from Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Other Wonders – Gaiman is well known for his surreal, humorous, and profound writing. His short stories are no exception. In this story, the personifications of the months gather around to listen to October’s turn to tell a story about a young boy find out more than he wanted when he decides to run away from home. Gaiman artfully crafts a fable-like tale for fairy tale characters who come to life on the page.
  5. “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson – This story is a classic one that I read back in high school. I was initially confused but soon found out that this story provides a much darker message than it gives away. Jackson paints the picture of a quaint little town built on dark traditions. It is hard to create the perfect plot twist and Jackson doesn’t fail to deliver a shock at the very end.
  6. “The Dead” by James Joyce from Dubliners – Last year, I went to Dublin on spring break specifically for Joyce. One of my professors is a leading Joyce scholar so it would be foolish of me not to mention any of Joyce’s short stories. Dubliners is a tricky read but it is endlessly fascinating. “The Dead” is the final story in the collection and it takes an introspective look into the life of a man who is struggling with his identity. The very last line of the story is profound and brings the whole novel into perspective. Even if you haven’t read Dubliners, the story is still just as powerful.
  7. “There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury – I’ve been a fan of Bradbury for a while and, in particular, I remember reading this story in grade school. “There Will Come Soft Rains” follows the daily goings on of an automated “smart house” that continues to operate despite the fact that no one is living there. The story serves as a warning for how technology may develop and how it could change the environment. Bradbury’s haunting and detailed science fiction story is another great example of how to master the plot twist.
  8. “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver – One of the more famous short stories out there, Carver’s message of “don’t judge a book by its cover” is just as powerful with each read. When a man wife invites a blind man to their house, he is reluctant to let him stay. However, he soon learns how to understand how other people live as he spends more time with the blind man.
  9. “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe – Yet another classic Poe story, this one is a bit more famous. Poe was famous for his unreliable narrators and this story is one that makes the reader question what truly makes someone insane.
  10. “Flowers for Algernon” by Daniel Keyes – Much like Gilman’s story, this one also calls into question the ethics of how mental health is treated. Though it involves science fiction, Keyes is still not too far off from reality. This story follows Charlie Gordon, a man with an IQ of 68, who undergoes a surgery to increase his intelligence. He and a mouse named Algernon who also received the surgery are then subjected to scrutiny as they are thrust into the spotlight.

Laughter was light, and Light was Laughter: Reviewing The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

Sorry, I haven’t posted anything in a while but I wanted to take some time to catch up on my reading before I reviewed another book. I bought Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch last year and this is the first opportunity I have had to actually read the whole thing. It is a longer book but it is still worth it. Since reading The Secret History, I have been looking forward to reading more of Tartt’s novels. Now, I will review The Goldfinch for you.

When Theo Decker was thirteen years old, he survives an explosion in an art museum that unfortunately takes his beloved mother from him. He finds himself uprooted with only a small painting he recovered from the wreckage and the last words of a dying old man that lead him to his new mentor. In his adult life, Theo spends his life with antiques and is captivated by the same painting that eventually leads him to a dangerous circle.

Tartt’s ability to blend the modern world with the beauty of Dutch art makes this novel an elegant but relatable read. Her descriptions and characterizations are poetic. The characters feel as though they could walk off the page. Tartt doesn’t hold back in her exploration of human emotions as she connects Theo’s story with the stories of the Dutch artists. You don’t have to be an art expert to enjoy this book. The Goldfinch is a tragedy, romance, and mystery all wrapped up in the clean bow of Tartt’s eloquence and honesty.

 

The Game of Thrones Tag

Ok, you might hate me for doing another tag but I couldn’t resist since I’m a big fan of the book series and the television show. Also, I figured since its the final season of the show I wouldn’t get another chance to do this tag. I’ve been seeing this tag all over the place but here’s the source I’m using specifically. @theclockworkbibliophile

Part 1

greyjoy

“We do not sow” – A book you would not be willing to invest in

When I first read Lolita by Vladmir Nabokov, I wanted to to be interested initially but I was too creeped out and just wanted to stop reading it. Unfortunately, I was required to read it for a class.

targaryen

“Fire and Blood” – A book that produced strong emotions for you

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows destroyed me because it was the last book in the series and all of the deaths were devastating in their own right.

stark 2

“Winter is Coming” – your favorite winter read

Well, obviously the Harry Potter books are always great for winter.

tully

“Family, Duty, Honor” – A book about strong family ties

Again, Harry Potter is a good choice but also The Hunger Games is a good one. Let’s face it, though, Game of Thrones is probably the best choice for this one.

tyrell

“Growing Strong” – A book you had low expectations for but it grew on you

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini definitely ended up having more of an impact on me than I though and I still love that book.

baratheon

“Ours is the Fury” – A book that made you furious

Allegiant, which is the last book in the Divergent series, pissed me off to no end. The Circle by Dave Eggers also pissed me off so much that I didn’t even read the whole thing.

martell

“Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken” – A book series you have unwavering devotion to.

I wouldn’t be here with Harry Potter, that’s for sure.

lannister

“A Lannister Always Pays His Debts” – A book you feel indebted to

American Gods by Neil Gaiman really opened my eyes and taught me more about writing and mythology.

Part 2

Who do you want to win the Game of Thrones?

As much as I love Daenerys to win, I think that she might unintentionally carry on the tradition of Targaryens being insane rulers so I’m going to have to pick Jon Snow. Also, I believe in the theory that he is also a Targaryen which would fulfill the title of the series, A Song of Fire and Ice. 

Part 3

Who do you think will die? Who do you think will make it to the end?

My list of survivors: Jon Snow, Tyrion and Jamie Lannister, Brienne of Tarth, Asha and Theon Greyjoy, Sansa Stark, Varys, Bran Stark, Daenerys Targaryen, Daario Naharis, Samwell Tarly, Olena Tyrell

My list of casualties: Cersei Lannister, Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish, Jorah Mormont, Melissandre, Davos Seaworth, Gendry, Arya Stark, Tormund Giantsbane, Ellaria Sand

Part 4

Would you win or die?

I may not have a ton of resources but I’m pretty logical and strategic. Would I win though? I hope so if I play my cards right.

Part 5

Which house are you apart of?

I think I would be a member of House Stark because I have very bad luck but still somehow succeed despite the odds.

Now it’s your turn. Feel free to join me in this tag.

 

How My Reading Habits Have Changed Over the Years

I don’t know if any other bookworms have done this but, on occasion, I realize how much my taste in books or the way I read books has changed since I was young. Now, I do certainly have staples. I still generally read fiction and I’m always reading more than one book at a time but some slight changes have come up in my reading life. Maybe some of you have experienced similar things or maybe you haven’t. Here is a quick list of what I’ve noticed has changed.

  • Series: I haven’t read a book series in a rather long time. As a kid, I read a lot of series and I believe the most recent one I read was The Song of Fire and Ice series, which I read back in high school. Most of the books I read now are standalone. Why is it that there are very few series for adults? Maybe I’ve simply lost patience for book series. I still have favorites but I haven’t been interested in any book series in a while.
  • Romance: I’ve never been a huge fan of romance novels but I used to get more invested in romantic relationships in books. Now, unless it’s intended to be a romantic novel, I could care less if my characters are in relationships or not. Is that weird?
  • Fantasy: I do still like fantasy novels but it no longer catches my interest as much. I don’t pick up books solely because they belong to a particular genre I enjoy. I used to do that more when I was younger. Fantasy elements no longer hook me in like they used to.
  • Trends: When I was kid, the Twilight phenomenon had struck the pop culture scene and I was one of the many preteen victims. Like others, I do regret it now but it made me think that I can’t think of any book trends that are popular right now. Harry Potter is making a comeback, which is great, but I haven’t noticed any huge trends in the literary world. Maybe I’m just getting old and I no longer notice this stuff.
  • Classics: I’ve found myself wanting to read more classic novels. You know, authors like Woolf, Hemingway, Austen, the Brontes, Dostoyvesky, and other authors that are worshipped by writers and readers alike. I almost feel like I have an obligation to read these authors. I don’t know if I’ll enjoy any of these or not but I would like to try at least.

That’s my stream of consciousness for now. I’m still stalling until I read enough to write another book review. I would definitely by interested in hearing if any of you other book worms feel the same way that I do or maybe you haven’t noticed any changes in how or what you read. Either way, don’t stop reading what you love.

The Stranger Things Book Tag/Challenge

I found another fandom related book tag that caught my interest. Again, I found this on another blog that I will link to you so you can check them out. Here’s my new tag, you mouth breathers.

 

eleven

Eleven: A book that you own that is damaged to pieces but you still love it

Definitely my copy of American Gods by Neil Gaiman. I have a bad habit of picking at my books but I can’t imagine getting a new copy anytime soon.

mike, lucas, dustin

Mike, Lucas, and Dustin: A book trilogy you always go to whenever you need a pick-me-up

I would definitely have to pick The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins

demogorgon

The Demogorgon: A book with a terrifying beast that you would not want to face in the dark

I’d be pretty terrified to face the Dementors from the Harry Potter series

dr brenner

Dr. Brenner: A book with a villain who is both manipulative and dedicated

The titular character from Bram Stoker’s Dracula. The count himself is willing to do anything it takes to terrorize England and has endless patience.

nancy wheeler

Nancy Wheeler: A book you didn’t expect to love

I didn’t think I would care for The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins but I ended up loving it.

hawkins

Hawkins, Indiana: A book with a setting that’s just a little bit strange

The town of Derry, Maine in It by Stephen King is meant to be a relatively normal town with a bizarre string of murders. King is great at taking normal settings and making them terrifying.

That is the end of the tag. I will probably doing more of these in the future and I hope to see more of you do them to. I will like the source of this tag. I encourage you to check out that blog. Remember, don’t keep your curiosity door locked!

The Punk Theory