The Anything but Books Tag

It’s no surprise that I’m doing yet another tag but I figured I do one that is not related in anyway to books so that you all can get to know me a bit more. I found this tag from Charlotte Annelise so check out her blogs. In the meanwhile, feel free to learn some things about me.

Name a Cartoon that You Love – I’ve actually become a fan of Rick and Morty recently. Normally, I’m not a huge cartoon person outside of Disney movies but this cartoon matches my sick sense of humor.

rick and morty

What is your Favorite Song right now? – I’m currently a fan of “Angel on Fire” by Halsey, “Too Good at Goodbyes” by Sam Smith, and “Heroin” by Lana Del Rey.

lana del rey

What could you do for hours that isn’t reading? – I’d probably be watching movies/tv shows/YouTube videos because I’m a bum like that.

tv

What’s something you love to do that your followers would be surprised by? – I don’t know but I guess you all might be surprised that I like cooking. I don’t do it often but I do own cookbooks that I’ve used.

cooking

What is your favorite unnecessarily specific thing that you like to learn about? – I’m a bit of a conspiracy theory buff. Do I exactly believe what in those theories? No. Are they still fascinating to learn about? Yes, if you ask me. Also I just love learning weird facts so feel free to send me some good ones.

conspiracy

What’s something unusual that you know how to do? – I actually know a lot about camping stuff, like how to tie certain knots or properly cook food over a fire. I used to camp a lot when I was younger and was a Girl Scout for a time.

camping

Did you make something in the last year, and if so, can you show it? – I’m pretty darn inartistic. My mom, on the other hand, is super crafty so if I had a picture I would show you one of the Halloween wreaths that she made.

What is your most recent personal project? – I’ve had a novel and some short stories on the back burner for a while now but I’ve done anything with them in a while.

writing

Tell us something that you think about often? – What am I going to eat next?

pooh bear

Give us something that is your favorite but oddly specific – Hair-brushing ASMR, Songs with a Person’s Name in the Title, Jalepno Poppers that have Cream Cheese Filling, Vintage Ghost Photos, and Dark Blue Boot Cut Jeans

weird

Say the first thing that pops into your head – what the fuck is happening now?

thats me

 

As Above, So Below: Reviewing Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

I bet that you’ve been waiting for me to talk about how much I love Neil Gaiman’s novels. Well, I’m back to tell you about another one of his novels. I meant to write about this one a while ago but I forgot. I have since re-read the book and will now share with you my thoughts on the strange world of Neverwhere. 

Richard Mayhew was doing pretty well for himself with a nice job and wonderful fiancee  in London. All of that changed when he stumbled across a dying girl on the sidewalk. Soon, Richard finds himself trapped in the bizarre and macabre world of London Below where he must fight to get his life back and reach the surface against all odds.

Neil Gaiman is the master of creating vivid settings and characters with just his words. Neverwhere is a wild and wonderful take on the classic “Alice in Wonderland”-type story. Gaiman’s wicked sense of humor shines through in this whimsical novel. Neverwhere is a testament to Gaiman’s world-building abilities. If you are looking for a thrilling and special tale, then I recommend Neverwhere in order to escape from this world to one below.

Wilting, Falling, Rooting, Rising, Blooming: Reviewing The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur

I may have said before that I have never been a huge fan of poetry. I’m awful at writing it and it doesn’t hold my attention for long. Older poetry tends  to bore me, though I have a few exceptions. In the modern era, though, poetry has been redefined to become more relatable and powerful. I will now present to you my thought on Rupi Kaur’s second collection of poetry, the sun and her flowers. 

Rupi Kaur continues her exploration of life and its struggles in her new set of poems. Kaur doesn’t hold back as she talks about her own personal experiences with pain and how she has learned to recover. Each poem, long and short, is carefully crafted to provide profound insight into her life and the lives of others. Her simple illustrations create a dreamy feel that fits her ongoing aesthetic. With the metaphor of flowers and foliage, Kaur leads the reader through her life’s struggles while providing a relatable narrative for almost anyone.

I truly think Kaur’s books should be read by every woman. Kaur is such a powerful feminist writer and she isn’t afraid to talk about more taboo issues, such as rape or dealing with body image. Poetry isn’t my “thing” but Kaur is my exception. If you’re already a fan then you should read this second collection and, if you aren’t a fan, go out and read this poetry. You might realize that these were things that you needed to read.

Book Tropes I Absolutely Hate

I talk about many books I love and a few that I was unimpressed with but I haven’t done a full-on rant yet. I’m not going to be ranting about any books in particular but I will be highlighting tropes that I feel need to be thrown in the literary trash heap of things writers need to stop doing. These are in no particular order. I hope some of you share my opinion or maybe have a horrible trope that I didn’t mention.

Questionable Consent – I don’t know when we started thinking it was sexy for one character to reluctantly give into another character’s romantic desires but I think this one needs to die. Either both characters are in a relationship or they aren’t. Pressuring someone into a relationship isn’t attractive and we need to stop portraying this in novels.

confused

Indecisive Characters – Indecision is a perfectly viable plot device that can be used correctly to develop a character but your character ought to make a damn decision. This especially happens with female characters who are caught in some stupid love triangle. If you’re going to have your character face a tough decision, make it matter.

i don't know

Needless Character Deaths – Character deaths can be essential to a story, especially depending on the genre of story. That being said, even if the character shows up just to die or begins the story being dead, make it matter. Don’t let this person die for no good reason and don’t forget about their death. Make sure to refer back to the death as being important, regardless of if the character is good or bad or in between. Don’t kill off just because you want to.

time to die

Mental Illness as a Quirk – If you want to write about a character with mental illness then go for it but make sure that you are giving a realistic portrayal. As someone who suffers from anxiety, I can tell you that panic attacks aren’t “cute” nor am I looking for someone who will “cure” me. Don’t try to romanticize mental health issues, or even physical health issues.

nervous

Uneven Couples – It’s a perfectly normal part of romance literature to create couple that are opposites but don’t make your characters so opposite that they are basically incompatible. I hate when you’re reading a book and one half of the couple is some sort of perfect, successful, angel while the other person is basically a pile of trash. It’s especially worse when the perfect one tries to “fix” the garbage one. Write your couples better.

what

Main Characters with Stupid Problems – The whole point of your main character is to give them actual serious problems to solve. Don’t juxtapose your character’s problems with a side character’s problems who are significantly worse. I’m not going to care if the main character can’t pick which shirt to wear when their friend is dealing with a broken leg or something.

stupid

Too Much Perfection – We want our characters to have redeeming qualities but you have to balance them out with some weaknesses. Even if we’re talking physical qualities, don’t make your character unbelievably perfect. Make them a little human, at least.

perfect

The Punching Bag – If you’re writing an action-based story, make sure your character actually does react to pain like a normal person. Sure, your character might have a more strength or endurance than an average human but they should still react to an injury like any other person. Don’t make them a punching bag that can just take hit after hit without problems. Eventually, your character should get knocked down and not get back up right away.

punching

Lack of Consequences – When you do something bad or questionable, then the result of your actions should catch up with you. Regardless of if we’re talking a protagonist or antagonist, their actions should somehow result in consequences even if its karma taking place.

consequences

The Pseudo Nerd – Your character is allowed to have interests but make sure that they actually know what they’re talking about. Just because your main character can name all of the planets in our solar system, it doesn’t mean that they are an aspiring astronomer like the writer says they are. Don’t be lazy and not do research.

nerd

Too Much Crying – I feel like a hypocrite writing this because I am a bit of a cry baby but I still eventually suck it up and go on. This should be the case for your characters. I don’t want to read about your Mary Sue sobbing non-stop for no real reason. Keep the crying to a reasonable amount please.

crying

Everything Affects Everything: Reviewing Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

I was actually required to read this book for the Young Adult Literature class I’m currently taking. I was a bit skeptical about this book going in. I had heard mixed reviews about this novel so I was a bit hesitant to read it. It’s certainly a difficult book to read and review. Suicide is never a topic that comes up with ease. Most of the time, people have to pull the word out of themselves in order to talk about it. But it is something that needs to be talked about so now I will give you my review of Thirteen Reasons Why, Jay Asher’s debut novel.

Clay Jensen’s life had just returned to normal when a package shows up that changes everything he knows. It contains tapes that were made by his deceased classmate, Hannah Baker, who tragically took her own life not too long ago. Clay decides to embark on a journey around his town with Hannah guiding him in order to learn why the reasons why she took her life. Asher’s unique and haunting narration provides an impactful look at teen suicide and how it affects others.

Like I said, I was skeptical about this novel going in but I now have a better understanding of it. Asher’s writing is breath-taking and suspenseful as he helps the reader (and Clay) understand how even small actions can have a huge impact on people’s lives. Hannah and Clay are unnervingly relatable as they both struggle with the consequences of their actions. Asher isn’t afraid to reveal the toxic environments that teenagers face as they struggle through high school. Thirteen Reasons Why is a hard pill to swallow but it’s worth it in order to understand the importance of being kind to others.

Note: I have not watched the Netflix series but I haven’t heard good reviews about it. If you have watched it, I would like to know what you think and how it compares to the book.