It’s Growing Something New: Reviewing Annihilation (Book One of the Southern Reach Trilogy) by Jeff Vandermeer

Hi everyone! It has been a hot minute since I have actually done a book review. I finally sat down and just powered through this particular novel since it is shorter. I will now tell you all about Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer.

Area X sprouted from the ruins of a civilization and has been steadily reclaiming the land over the years. Many expeditions have tried to explore this mysterious new biosphere but have ended in death and disaster. The twelfth expedition, made up of four women, have set out to find the answers that the others couldn’t find. As they venture deeper and deeper into Area X, they come to realize that there is something thriving and it has deadly intentions.

This short and fast-paced novel offered an interesting mix of science fiction and mystery. Vandermeer’s writing style and narrative choices are certainly intriguing. Told through the eyes of a character only known as the biologist, her telling of the events is scientific and precise but also vague and ominous. Every step of her journey only offers more questions than answers. As a reader, I found myself exploring along with her. I wanted to put together the puzzle pieces of why Area X was so strange. The novel definitely reminded me of The Martian. I loved the eerie and beautiful descriptions. The plot was full of suspense that made you want more. If you’re a fan of science fiction and/or adventure, then I would definitely reckoned Vandermeer’s Annihilation. I am certainly interested in reading the rest of the Southern Reach trilogy.

Be Strong, Saith My Heart: Reviewing Circe by Madeline Miller

Hello everyone! I am beyond excited to talk to you about Madeline Miller’s sophomore novel. I have reviewed her debut novel, The Song of Achilles. You can check that out on my blog. Anyways, I do absolutely love mythology, in particular Greek mythology. I also enjoy these particular stories that are classic tales retold with a new angle. Novels likes Wicked have shown how popular this trope is and how it is really great when done well. I shall continue on and tell you all about Circe by Madeline Miller. (Quick note: Circe is pronounced as Sir-See.)

During the fall of the Titans, Circe was born to Helios, a god of the sun and a powerful force. From her birth, Circe realized she was different that the other immortals and turns to mortals for comfort. Circe then discovers her true talent: witchcraft. She is banished by Zeus and Helios to a remote island for eternity. There she hones her powers and crosses paths with many icons of mythology, with the most notable being the cunning Odysseus. Circe, however, soon finds herself in danger after angering the gods and Titans alike. Circe must prove her true powers or else lose everything that she loves in this thrilling and vivid story.

I was absolutely hooked on this book from the first page. Circe herself is a relatively lesser known figure in Greek mythology who is only really known for having an affair with Odysseus. Miller, however, saw this character and turned her into a force to be reckoned with. The first thing I wanted to talk about was the mythology backdrop and the godly characters. They felt equally as human as they did divine. The competition between the Olympians and the Titans felt very much like Game of Thrones, which I enjoyed. With that being said, the novel did present a certain harsh reality within the mythical world. Circe herself embodied what it meant to be a survivor, in my opinion. Despite her familial history, she still goes through many struggles with little to no help. The novel certainly carries a feminist message throughout, which I found very empowering. Her voice, thoughts, and feelings are all very strong and honest. Miller certainly proves that even gods struggle but that there is hope through survival and perseverance. You probably know I’m going to highly recommend this novel to you. Circe was an exciting and emotional reading experience that is impossible to put down.

Note: I got the title of this review from The Odyssey. I do actually really enjoy that epic.

Celebrating the Feminine: Some quotes in honor of International Women’s Day

Hello Everyone! I wasn’t planning on posting again until my next review. I finally got a new book to read but I haven’t been able to sit down and read it yet. Hopefully, I will get you that review soon. In the meanwhile, I decided to celebrate International Women’s Day with some quotes from famous female authors. I hope you enjoy. Feel free to share your favorite quotes in the comments or make your own post.

“I will not have my life narrowed down. I will not bow down to somebody else’s whim or to someone else’s ignorance.” – Bell Hooks

“Above all, be the heroine of your own life…” – Nora Ephron

“I am too intelligent, too demanding, and too resourceful for anyone to be able to take charge of me entirely. No one knows me or loves me completely. I only have myself.” – Simone de Beauvior

“I am not afraid of storms, for I’m learning how to sail my ship.” – Louisa May Alcott

“I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.” – Jane Austen

“I love to see a young girl go out and grab life by the lapels. Life’s a bitch. You’ve got to go out and kick ass.” – Maya Angelou

“We do not need magic to transform our world. We already carry all the power we need inside ourselves already. We have the power to imagine better.” – JK Rowling

“A word after a word after a word is power.” – Margaret Atwood

“The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who’s going to stop me.” – Ayn Rand

“The beginning is always today.” – Mary Shelley

“If theres’ a book you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” – Toni Morrison

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” – Anne Frank

“We realize the importance of our voices only when we are silenced.” – Malala Yousafzai

 

 

 

 

 

Wilting, Falling, Rooting, Rising, Blooming: Reviewing The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur

I may have said before that I have never been a huge fan of poetry. I’m awful at writing it and it doesn’t hold my attention for long. Older poetry tends  to bore me, though I have a few exceptions. In the modern era, though, poetry has been redefined to become more relatable and powerful. I will now present to you my thought on Rupi Kaur’s second collection of poetry, the sun and her flowers. 

Rupi Kaur continues her exploration of life and its struggles in her new set of poems. Kaur doesn’t hold back as she talks about her own personal experiences with pain and how she has learned to recover. Each poem, long and short, is carefully crafted to provide profound insight into her life and the lives of others. Her simple illustrations create a dreamy feel that fits her ongoing aesthetic. With the metaphor of flowers and foliage, Kaur leads the reader through her life’s struggles while providing a relatable narrative for almost anyone.

I truly think Kaur’s books should be read by every woman. Kaur is such a powerful feminist writer and she isn’t afraid to talk about more taboo issues, such as rape or dealing with body image. Poetry isn’t my “thing” but Kaur is my exception. If you’re already a fan then you should read this second collection and, if you aren’t a fan, go out and read this poetry. You might realize that these were things that you needed to read.